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Waving goodbye to old content

December 31, 2017

 

As we migrate to a new platform. a lot of content has been removed from the Waves PR website, as it moves to a new, better format, more representative of my work.

 

It was hard to remove some of the content which I was emotionally attached to - events like Twestival and Tweetcamp, reviews of events, social media trends - all now outdated. And there was 10 year's worth to peruse. Over 600 blogs worth!

 

Interestingly it's been the crisis management blogs and reviews of reports that have delivered more 'evergreen' content  - not so much because of the events they describe, which are, for the most part, forgotten, but for the principles that they illustrate.

 

Content that's no longer here, which may be the reason you've arrived at this blog post, and recorded mainly for posterity, includes:

 

Investment stories

In 2010 TechCrunch broke stories of investors apparently working together to fix low valuations for new start-up companies, and  to keep better-funded venture capitalists from investing. I removed content around 'Angelgate' because the investment agenda has moved on.

 

I've also taken down stories about blatant sexism in the industry. I hope with the  'Me Too' movement we'll start to see a big clear up, across all industries.

 

And of course the opening dates for funding 'competitions', long since closed, serve no useful purpose.

 

From a bygone era, I've removed content from The Difference Engine. I did a small bit of work with this start up incubator, but it's made a lasting impact in terms of friendships, connection and warmth.

 

Conferences and events

There were reports from places I've presented. These include Sascon, 

And from some I've simply attended, like the first Like Minds in Exeter, the Media 140 events in the early, heady days of Twitter, various Guardian conferences, 

 

More important at the time were blogs about Twestivals (the Twitter festivals, a ground up social media movement that raised money for charities), and Tweetcamps, which gathered people to discuss the next stages of Twitter usage.

 

It was also hard to let go of blogs about Soma Salon, which had everything to do with social progress and community action, but little to do with PR, and the movement it spawned, Techfugees, is invaluable.

 

Harder still was letting go of the blogs relating to Ada Lovelace Day, focussing on the heroes of tech including Dame Wendy Hall at Southampton University and Hedy Lamar.  There will be more in future, and diversity, particularly gender equality, remain a Waves core value.

 

Social Media notes

Time moves fast, and in the same way that I no longer train media outreach in the same ways, information on new platforms and stats on adoption are interesting historically, but of no use to anyone finding the blogs now.

 

Similarly reports on Social Media Week are dated, and even the event itself has changed beyond measure.

 

Thupr events

I ran a series of events on technology to support PR tactics, from database and distribution to social media management tools, from gamification to moderation. They were great events, and one of the most enjoyable was a small event when Google + first launched. The information from them is now very dated. (Happy memories, though.)

 

Green agenda stories

I remain a committed environmentalist, although one with a dilemma as technology and environment are often at odds. However, I think the agenda has moved on - we now embrace greener technologies in ways we didn't  a decade ago. 

 

I was heavily involved with organisations like 350 and 1010, but the agenda has moved on. A climate change denier now sits in the World's most powerful political role. 

 

I look forward to working more with green and ethical companies in a World where environment is currently playing second fiddle to financial concerns, but where many younger, fresher companies are finding new solutions.

 

PR Ethics

PR ethics are a hotly debated subject, but. like SEO. the industry has moved on.

 

I was laughed at when I set up my first consultancy.  'ethical PR' business, Zed PR. Ethical PR was seen as an oxymoron.  Today, ethics are firmly on the agenda. Some of the worst offenders have been relegated to history. And with them, blogs about their misdemeanours.

 

SEO Content

It's really important that PR understands its relationship to SEO and other digital disciplines. But SEO content is far from enduring, and specialists work day and night to keep things up to date. So blogs relating to SEO advice have been removed simply because good advice in 2009 is unlikely to be good advice now- this may well be freshened up with new ones going forward.

 

Airline responses

Airline's have to get it right - and as they sometimes struggle to communicate positively on the ground with customers, it's probably only surprising that we don't see more criticism.  Indeed, any poor handling of situations can cost them dear.

 

In 2010, an Icelandic volcano, Eyjafjallajökull, erupted. grounding thousands.  I took the time to examine the  customer responses of airlines including BA, Delta, BMI and EasyJet. I imagine they learned from the experience, and I'm sure they will provide plenty of future blogs, just because they are so public, and it's tough to get it right.

 

On journalism

I still feel that the Internet Manifesto has value, but the Guardian says it better.

 

My support for Article 19 stemmed from my desire to support media colleagues, as well as feeding my interest in human rights. However, the content doesn't need to be on my blog, but I'll continue to suoport them and to share their source reports in social spaces. As net neutrality becomes an issue, and freedom of expression becomes increasingly threatened, their role is more vital than ever.

 

So keep an eye out for occasions like World Press Freedom Day and its ilk going forward.

 

Absent friends

The passing of journalist Guy Kewney and Yandex founder Ilya Segalovich were significant to me, Guy because I'd worked with him and Ilya because I'd interviewed him and loved his thoughts on the direction of the web. The blogs  were too dated to keep.

 

I did, howvere keep a generic blog on grief in social spaces.

 

Ipadio stories

I loved working with the team at startup ipadio when it launched. We had exciting recordings up mountains, from polar expeditions, from Greenpeace out at sea - the news as it happened. Those stories are no longer on the public site, so it makes no sense to keep them live here.

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